Stories

Location: Norway, Kjensvatn

Photographer: Hans Fredrik Asbjørnsen

From Lake Gressvatn in the upper left corner of the photo, the water will run in a six-kilometre long tunnel down to the newly constructed power station when the work is complete. Until then, the water will be taken from the old river course. The entry point of the tunnel, where personnel and loaders drive out tons of rock each day, can be seen in the right in the photo.

The great white open

Statkraft’s new power plant is emerging in the white wilderness.

The Kjensvatn power plant, which will produce 80 GWh annually, is being developed at the foot of Northern Norway’s largest mountain, Mount Oksskolten in Hemnes municipality. The area is as majestic as it is desolate.

Just how desolate? Once you get off the nearest public road, you have 50 kilometres of construction road before the new power station emerges as a dark speck in the white landscape.

The development comprises three construction areas. One is the power station itself, the other is the construction of an 800-metre transmission tunnel and at the third site, a 20-kilometre 22 KV power line is taking shape.

“There are certain apparent challenges associated with constructing a new power plant in such a rugged area in the middle of winter,” says Leif Nordseth, project manager for the development of the Kjensvatn power plant.

There are certain apparent challenges associated with constructing a new power plant in such a rugged area in the middle of winter.

“For instance, we don’t have road access to all the construction sites. Snowmobiles are therefore the only real transport option in these areas.”

The personnel at the power station are not guaranteed that the construction road is open at all times. Until now, the road has not been closed for more than just a few hours at a time, but during these situations, HSE restrictions on what kind of work can be performed are in effect.

“Statkraft has about eight people who work full time on the project,” says Nordseth.

“We also have 70 people from contractors Bleikvassli Gruber AS, Salten Nettjenester and Leonhard Nilsen AS. These are companies based in Northern Norway and all have broad experience with working in the mountains during winter.”

Progress is slightly behind schedule, but Nordseth and his colleagues believe they will complete the work on time.

Commissioning and test production will start as planned in August 2014.

Text: Cato Gjertsen
Photo: Hans Fredrik Asbjørnsen
The article is also published in Statkraft's magazine People & Power no. 1/2013

Kjenstvatn
Kjenstvatn

Location: Norway, Kjensvatn

Photographer: Hans Fredrik Asbjørnsen

The ventilation pipe hangs from the roof of the transfer tunnel, which is being constructed between Lake Durmålsvatnet and the power station. Under the pipe, tire tracks show where loaders and excavators go, always loaded with rocks.

06. Mar. 2013